rail lines in nyc

🔥+ rail lines in nyc 02 Jul 2020 As a part of normal aging, the spine can develop arthritis. The discs lose ... This process of spinal nerve compression is called spinal stenosis. Back pain may or ...

rail lines in nyc Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (formerly juvenile rheumatoid arthritis) is the most common rheumatic condition among children and is distinct from adult RA.

For information about COVID-19, including symptoms and prevention, please read our COVID-19 patient guide. If you need to see your provider, please contact us to see if a Video Visit is right for you. Please also consider supporting Weill Cornell Medicine’s efforts against the pandemic..
rail lines in nychow to rail lines in nyc for

Search form

In This Section

Facet Syndrome In The News

Dr. Ali A. Baaj recently released a new book titled Revision Spine Surgery: Pearls and Pitfalls. Co-authored with Dr....

You are here

Facets are the parts of the spine that join vertebrae together and provide stability and normal range of motion. Facet joints are made of cartilage lubricated by a fluid-filled capsule that allows the joints to slide smoothly over each other. Facet syndrome develops when wear and tear thins out that capsule and the cartilage is no longer coated. As the joints rub roughly against each other, they become inflamed and irritated. Facet syndrome can develop anywhere in the spine but is most often found in the neck (cervical region) and lower back (lumbar).

Facet (pronounced FAS-et) syndrome, also called facet joint syndrome, is an arthritic condition of the joints of the vertebrae. The facets join the vertebrae together and provide stability and normal range of motion.

Arthritis is inflammation in the joints, and the facets are the joints in the spine, so facet syndrome is another name for facet arthritis. Facet joints (also known as zygapophysial joints, or z-joints) are in almost constant motion, which makes them especially prone to the degenerative changes associated with arthritis. Many doctors say that the 1 last update 2020/07/02 if a person lives long enough, facet syndrome is a certainty.Arthritis is inflammation in the joints, and the facets are the joints in the spine, so facet syndrome is another name for facet arthritis. Facet joints (also known as zygapophysial joints, or z-joints) are in almost constant motion, which makes them especially prone to the degenerative changes associated with arthritis. Many doctors say that if a person lives long enough, facet syndrome is a certainty.

Like many other joints, facet joints are made of cartilage lubricated by a fluid-filled capsule that allows the joints to slide smoothly over each other. Typically, facet syndrome develops when wear and tear thins out the fluid-filled capsule, the cartilage is no longer coated, and the joints rub roughly against each other rather than a slick glide. The joints react by becoming inflamed and irritated. This, in turn, can lead to the growth of bone spurs (osteophytes), which further limits joint movement, as well as damage to the nerves that exit near the joints.

Facet syndrome can develop anywhere in the spine but is most often found in the neck (cervical region) and lower back (lumbar). Flare-ups are seemingly unpredictable, and may occur intermittently several times in a month or just a few times a year. Facet syndrome strikes both men and women and is most common in individuals prone to arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, those who have had an injury affecting the spine, and in people between ages 40 and 70. Interestingly, some people can have facet joint degeneration with no painful symptoms.

What Causes Facet Syndrome?
Facet syndrome, or facet arthritis, is caused by joint degeneration from wear and tear, which naturally happens with aging. Other factors that may aggravate facet syndrome include:

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Fractures of the spine
  • Poor posture
  • Repetitive bending or twisting
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Sudden, vigorous stretching
  • Torn ligaments
  • Trauma, such as an accident, fall, or sports injury

 

rail lines in nychow to rail lines in nyc for Other spine conditions can also complicate matters and make the pain from facet syndrome worse. Disc degeneration — a breakdown of the shock-absorbing discs between the vertebrae — can lead to extra pressure on the facet joints, which, in turn, hastens the deterioration of the cartilage. Spondylolisthesis, a condition in which one of the vertebrae (bones) in the spine slips out of the proper position onto the vertebra below it, can also add to the load a compromised facet joint has to bear.

Reviewed by: Kai-Ming Fu, MD, PhD
Last reviewed/last for 1 last update 2020/07/02 updated: March 2018
Illustration by Thom Graves, CMIReviewed by: Kai-Ming Fu, MD, PhD
Last reviewed/last updated: March 2018
Illustration by Thom Graves, CMI

Doctors Who Treat Facet Syndrome

Procedures to Treat Facet Syndrome

Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF) the 1 last update 2020/07/02
Read More
Department of Neurological Surgery

New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center
525 East 68 Street, Box 99, New York NY 10065

rail lines in nychow to rail lines in nyc for Tel: 866-426-7787

© Weill Cornell Medical College. Reproduction, electronic or otherwise, without the permission of
Weill Cornell Medical College is strictly forbidden. All Rights Reserved. Legal Information
Acoustic Neuromas / Vestibular Schwannomas
Acromegaly
Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis
Aneurysm
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Arachnoid Cysts / Intracranial Cysts
Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM)
Astrocytoma
Atypical Teratoid/ Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT)
Back Pain
Basilar Invagination
Brain Abscess
Brain Cancer
Brain Tumors in Adults
Brain Tumors in Children
Brainstem Gliomas
Carotid Body Tumors
Carotid Occlusive Disease
Cavernous Malformations
Cerebral Ischemia
Chiari Malformation
Chordoma
Cleft Lip/Cleft Palate
Cognitive Dysfunction
Colloid Cysts
Concussion
Craniofacial Anomalies
Craniopharyngiomas
Craniosynostosis
Cushing's Disease
Deformational Plagiocephaly
Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG)
Dystonia
Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS)
Ependymoma
Epilepsy in Adults
Epilepsy in Children
Essential Tremor
Facet Syndrome
Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)
Gliomatosis Cerebri
Hemifacial Microsomia (HFM)
Hemifacial Spasm
Herniated Disc
Hydrocephalus
Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH)
Intracerebral Hemorrhage
Ischemia, Cerebral
Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytomas
Kyphosis
Lower Back Pain
Medulloblastoma
Meningioma
Metastatic Brain and Spine Tumors
Moyamoya Disease
Neurofibromatosis (NF1 and NF2)
Oligodendroglioma
Orbital Tumors
Parkinson’s Disease
Pediatric Seizure Disorders
Pineal Region Tumors
Pituitary Tumors
Post-Concussion Syndrome
Prolactinoma
Pseudotumor Cerebri
Pulsatile Tinnitus
Radiculopathy
Rathke Cleft Cyst
Retinoblastoma
Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction
Schwannomas
Scoliosis (Adult)
Spasticity
Spinal Compression Fractures
Spinal Cord Injuries
Spinal Deformity
Spinal Schwannomas
Spinal Stenosis
Spinal Tumors
Spondylolisthesis
Stroke
Subdural Hematoma
Syringomyelia
Tethered Spinal Cord
Thalamic Glioma
Tinnitus (Pulsatile)
Trigeminal Neuralgia
Vascular Brain Tumors
Vein of Galen Malformation